The First Photo Ever Created By A Japanese Photographer

Shimazu Nariakira by Japanese photographer Ichiki Shiroø
Shimazu Nariakira by Japanese photographer Ichiki Shiroø – earliest existing photo taken by Japanese photographer

In 1848, Ueno Shunnojo-Tsunetari (a Japanese trader based in Nagasaki) imported Japan’s first daguerreotype camera from Holland. The following year, the camera was obtained by Shimazu Nariakira, a Japanese feudal lord (daimyo) who ruled the Satsuma Domain from 1851 until his demise in 1958. Shimazu was renowned as an intelligent and wise lord, and noted for his great interest in all forms of Western technology.

Having obtained the camera, the daimyo ordered his retainers to study it and produce working photographs. One of these retainers was Ichiki Shirō (市来 四郎). Ichiki had previously excelled in the study of gunpowder production, which involved an understanding of chemistry. Due to this background, Shimazu believed Ichiki’s background would suit him for the challenge of mastering the creation of daguerreotypes – which entailed use of chemical treatments to develop the final image.

Alexander S. Wolcott's daguerreotype camera
Alexander S. Wolcott’s daguerreotype camera (above) and a cross section diagram of the camera (below). Image scanned from the book “Photography and the American Scene: A Social History, 1839-1889” by Robert Taft, published by Macmillan Company, 1938.

Due to his complete lack of formal training in photography and in how to use the camera, it was many years before Ichiki produced a quality photograph. To the daimyo’s delight, on September 17, 1857, Ichiki succeeded in creating a portrait of Shimazu dressed in formal attire. Ichiki recorded his struggles, and eventual triumph in mastering the camera, in his memoirs which he compiled in 1884.

After Shimazu’s death in 1958, the Terukuni Shrine (also referred to as Shōkoku Shrine) was built in Kagoshima as a memorial to the late daimyo. He was enshrined there in 1863, and the photograph was placed there as an object of worship. However, it later went missing in the 1800s.

After being lost for a century, the daguerreotype was discovered in 1975 a warehouse. Recognized as the oldest daguerreotype in existence that was created by a Japanese photographer, the photo was designated an Important Cultural Property by the Japanese government in 1999.

 

Vichaya Pop, a Very Impressive Thai Photographer

Boys with water buffalo in river
Boys with water buffalo in river, Thailand

A native of Bangkok, Vichaya Pop’s photography offers outsiders a glimpse into rural Asia life from a local’s point of view.

Boy playing with top
Boy playing with top in rural village

Although looking like studio shots, this Thai photographer captures his images only using beautiful natural light.

Father and son in hut
Father and son in hut, Thailand

The objective of Vichaya’s wide range of photos taken in his hometown Bangkok, as well as North Thailand or Myanmar, is to capture intimate moments of rural Asian life.

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Currently, Vichaya is expanding his range beyond Thailand, to other corners of Asia.

Best Places for Photography in Singapore

Marina Bay Sands
Marina Bay Sands at night

Photo by edwin.11 / CC-BY

Being so compact, and with a great transportation system, getting around Singapore to take a couple of photos is not difficult. Most visitors will certainly take shots of Singapore’s best known icons – the Merlion, Marina Bay Sands, etc. The following are a couple of ideas for different locations.

 

Chinatown, Singaopre
Pedestrians strolling in Chinatown

Photo by Kevin Carmody / CC-BY

Singapore’s Chinatown with it’s low rise shop buildings and eclectic mix of ornate Chinese, Buddhist and Hindu temples and shrines, is a great place for photographing a variety of sites and subjects.

 

Kampong Buangkok
Path through Kampong Buangkok

Photo by Walter Lim / CC-BY

Kampong Buangkok is outside the city proper, but is worth visiting for photos of traditional village life. One of the only places left where you can take photos of a traditional village of wooden houses, complete with chickens scratching in the shade of jackfruit and banana trees.

 

Little India, Singapore
Street view of Little India

Photo by Gabriel Garcia Marengo / CC-BY

Great street-style photos can be taken by visiting Little India. This market street is lined with stalls and shops selling Indian products – from piles of spices to garlands of flowers. The bustle of Indian customers and vendors will make you feel like you’re actually in India.

 

Singapore Night Safari
Singapore Night Safari

Photo by Allie Caulfield / CC-BY

If you’re interested in a challenge, visit Singapore’s Night Safari for the opportunity to shoot wild animals at night. While the low-light conditions (and prohibition against using a flash) is challenging, with a fast lens and stepped-up ISO it’s not impossible to get a truly unique photo.

 

Many first-time travellers to Asia, particularly those on business, have asked about easily accessible photo opportunities in the cities they visit. This post is part of an ongoing series, each on a different Asian city, introducing a few photo locations for visitors with limited time.

Unusual April Photo Opportunity: Japan’s Penis Festival

If you’re looking for a truly different photo opportunity, you might consider attending this unusual Japanese festival where revelers carry gigantic phalluses through the streets of a Japanese city.

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Photo by Takanori / CC-BY

The Kanamara Matsuri (“Festival of the Steel Phallus”) – also called the ‘Penis Festival’, is a Shinto fertility festival held on the first Sunday of April in Kawasaki, Japan. The festivities start at Kawasaki’s Kanayama Shrine.

F_KanaKukui_JPN_Kanamara_riding.jpg

Photo by Guilhem Vellut / CC-BY

The highlight of the celebration is when the gigantic phalluses are carried out of the shrine on portable shrines (mikoshi) and paraded throughout the streets. Capturing a good photo isn’t easy as you’ll have to contend with crowds of onlookers.

Parade at Penis festival, Kawasaki
Parade at Penis festival, at Kanayama Shrine in Kawasaki

Photo by Guilhem Vellut / CC-BY

During the event, penis-themed souvenirs ranging from penis-shaped lollipops and chocolates, to pens, key chains and more, are on sale.

Penis candles
Penis candles sold at a stand at the Kanamara Festival

Photo by Masayuki Kawagishi / CC-BY

What might seem as an outlandish display of sexuality is actually a very family-friendly affair. The crowd is full of people taking snapshots, so you don’t need to feel self-conscious taking photos.

Penis Festival @ Kanamara Festival @ Kanayama Shrine @ Kawasaki
Woman having photo taken on wooden phallus by friend

Photo by Guilhem Vellut / CC-BY